Category Archives: avocados

Strangely Delicious Avocado Concoctions

It is undeniably avocado season here; I am the happiest girl alive. Any initial disappointment and skepticism resulting from a couple of bad avocado experiences has completely dissipated. Far too much time has been spent dreaming up different and bizarre avocado recipes, but the results have been excellent. Don’t judge it before you try it.

destined for greatness.

1. Avocado (roughly mashed), cucumber (diced), curry powder, salt and pepper. Mix, enjoy.

2. Mango (cubed), avocado, a dollop of the hottest hot sauce you can get your hands on, feta cheese. (I think this is my favorite.)

3. Avocado mashed up with some creamy cheese (goats cheese, laughing cow cheese, whatever you have) and some hot sauce; about 1/2 cup of rehydrated hijiki or wakame seaweed; pasta. Mix it all together. Trust me on this one.

4. Avocado, yogurt (or ricotta cheese to make it thicker/richer), a little lime juice, a little honey. (Which, if you are in Mali, is about as dark and intense as molasses.) Maple syrup would also be delish, and dried or fresh coconut is an excellent addition if you happen to have it on hand. Blend everything together. Best. Smoothie. Ever.

5. One red onion, caramelized; one giant ripe avocado, sliced; a few pieces of whole grain bread, toasted. Stack as high as possible; salt and pepper to taste; try not to make a mess all over your face.

Avocado is one of those things that doesn’t need much help to be delicious, but that doesn’t stop me from experimenting. The fruit is wonderful on it’s own, and in any number of savory, salty, and sugary iterations… all I know is that my intake exceeds anything that the FDA would put on a pyramid. I am ok with that.

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some of my favorite things.

Frustration comes easily, living somewhere that’s not entirely familiar, where the simplest things are often misconstrued or misinterpreted. Not greeting someone in the morning; eating with the wrong hand (apparently the left hand is pretty tabou outside of Senegal as well, and you don’t want to know why); or any number of small little things that I have yet to pick up on. Conversely, there are plenty of things that make me smile for no reason whatsoever. Simple, seemingly silly things, that – thankfully – are pretty consistently present :
  1. Fancy Friday, or “boubou Friday” as some would have it. Whereas in the US, Friday is almost universally known for being a dress down day, here people do it up. It’s the day where all the men go to the mosquée, and men and women alike walk around in their best bazin for me, it’s a celebration that the weekend is actually here.
  2. When I needed flour last week (to make my ‘steamcake’), there was none in any of the grocery stores in my neighborhood.

    steamed to perfection

    Not entirely surprising. So I stopped by the boulangerie next door to my apartment, and, seeing at least ten 50-kilo sacks of flour behind the window, I asked the guy if he could sell me some flour. Of course he said no (what baker will sell you just the flour and not the bread?), but after explaining my situation, I walked away with a small black sachet full of wonderful white flour. For free. The cake was delicious.

  3. Avocados. Everywhere. At first I was skeptical, not gonna lie. I’ve had a few iffy experiences, and one really bad one. But this week, they hit the mark. I think I’ve eaten avocado every day, sometimes twice.
  4. Mangoes are even more prolific than avocados. And the two combined is better than you’d ever imagine. With a little hot pepper mixed in.
  5. the foam is the most important part

    Tea. AttayaThé. Whatever you want to call it. People drink tea here from sun-up to sundown. There is an entire process that goes along with it. Drunk from a small shotglass-like cup, it’s incredibly sweet, incredibly bitter, and if I’m *really* lucky, has some mint mixed in. Most of the time, I pass, but if it’s just right, it’s just perfect.

  6. Greetings. It takes about 45 minutes to greet anyone here, and basically goes like this. “Hi, good morning, how are you?” “Fine, thanks be to God, how are you? And the family?” “All’s well, thanks to God, how is work? And your family?” “Family is well, thanks be to God, how is your health? And your wife and children?” “Thanks to God, all is well. How are your children?” Etc, etc. This continues, the same questions being repeated over and over. It has this amazing back and forth rhythm, like a call and response, and I aspire – by the end of my time here – to have mastered it. For now, I can get about two lines in before I trip over my own western tongue. I’ve got three months to find my rhythm.

not sure what's going on with my hair here, but me voilà, and Bara in his bazin best!